Gaius Marius, a famous Roman general. I’m not really sure if this counts, considering this painting was created almost a millenium after his death, but artist John Vanderlyn certainly had a nice imagination.

Gaius Marius, a famous Roman general. I’m not really sure if this counts, considering this painting was created almost a millenium after his death, but artist John Vanderlyn certainly had a nice imagination.

Ferenc Liszt - Hungarian composer, one of the Chopin’s close friends and  the definition of womanizer.

Ferenc Liszt - Hungarian composer, one of the Chopin’s close friends and  the definition of womanizer.

The last prince of Korea, Prince Yi Wu (or Lee Woo) was pretty dang cute.

The last prince of Korea, Prince Yi Wu (or Lee Woo) was pretty dang cute.

Jean Toomer, pictured here, was an American poet and novelist and an important figure both in the Harlem Renaissance and the modernism movement of the Lost Generation. His first book Cane, published in 1923, is a synthesis of the ideas and experimentation seen in both the Harlem Renaissance and modernism and is considered by many to be his most significant writing.
He was also a total hottie.
This is a photograph of him when he was quite young.  He also grew a mustache later in life, if that’s your jam.

Jean Toomer, pictured here, was an American poet and novelist and an important figure both in the Harlem Renaissance and the modernism movement of the Lost Generation. His first book Cane, published in 1923, is a synthesis of the ideas and experimentation seen in both the Harlem Renaissance and modernism and is considered by many to be his most significant writing.

He was also a total hottie.

This is a photograph of him when he was quite young.  He also grew a mustache later in life, if that’s your jam.

Christian VII was king of Denmark and Norway from 1766 to 1808. He was mentally ill and was unable to rule which his advicers already did most of. And with mentally ill I mean he was reported for randomly slapping people during conversations. But you know what? He was beautiful, so I’ll forgive him.

Christian VII was king of Denmark and Norway from 1766 to 1808. He was mentally ill and was unable to rule which his advicers already did most of. And with mentally ill I mean he was reported for randomly slapping people during conversations. But you know what? He was beautiful, so I’ll forgive him.

Name: Claus von Stauffenberg
Description: German army officer. One of the important members of “German Resistance” movement. Tried to kill one of the important German.
Journey from nowhere to my being my crush: Attempted to kill Hitler. Failed. “Operation Valkyrie” failed. Executed by firing squad.

Name: Claus von Stauffenberg

Description: German army officer. One of the important members of “German Resistance” movement. Tried to kill one of the important German.

Journey from nowhere to my being my crush: Attempted to kill Hitler. Failed. “Operation Valkyrie” failed. Executed by firing squad.

Hector Castro (1904-1960), Uruguayan footballer.  Due to an accident in his childhood in which he chopped off half of his right arm with an electric saw (it happens to the best of us), fans gave Castro the nickname ’El Divino Manco”, or “the one handed god.” Far from being held back by his amputee status, Castro used his disability to his advantage, even injuring the Argentinian goalkeeper in the 1930 World Cup final by smacking him in the leg with his arm stump.  The Uruguayan scored the final goal in that match, assuring his team’s status as the first ever FIFA World Cup champions.  

Hector Castro (1904-1960), Uruguayan footballer.  Due to an accident in his childhood in which he chopped off half of his right arm with an electric saw (it happens to the best of us), fans gave Castro the nickname ’El Divino Manco”, or “the one handed god.” Far from being held back by his amputee status, Castro used his disability to his advantage, even injuring the Argentinian goalkeeper in the 1930 World Cup final by smacking him in the leg with his arm stump.  The Uruguayan scored the final goal in that match, assuring his team’s status as the first ever FIFA World Cup champions.  

David Kenyon Webster (1922-1961) was a private with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II.
Webster volunteered for the paratroopers in 1943, before he could graduate from Harvard University. He transferred to Easy after D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), and then fought in Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany) before sustaining a leg injury while stationed in “the Island” in Arnhem, Holland. The injury caused him to miss the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France).
Webster never became a noncommissioned officer in his time of service, even though his fellow paratroopers wanted him to become a squad leader. He never did anything voluntarily or that would be cause for promotion, instead choosing to be “an observer and chronicler of the war” (which is touched on during episode 8 of HBO’s Band of Brothers). He did earn a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and a Good Conduct Medal while in combat, though.
After the war, he worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. He did try to write a memoir about his time in Europe, but it didn’t come to be until 1994. Webster had a keen interest in ocean life, sharks especially. This passion led him to write a book called Myth and Maneater: The Story of the Shark, and might also have led to his (untimely) death. Webster was lost at sea in September 1961, and his body was never recovered; it’s assumed that he probably drowned :(
Web was an English Lit major at Harvard, which is right up my alley. I tend to like the “sensitive writer” types, plus he’s really pretty (and not just in BoB). He got pretty cynical towards the end of the war, but can you blame him? I was super bummed when I found out he’d gone missing.

David Kenyon Webster (1922-1961) was a private with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II.

Webster volunteered for the paratroopers in 1943, before he could graduate from Harvard University. He transferred to Easy after D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), and then fought in Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany) before sustaining a leg injury while stationed in “the Island” in Arnhem, Holland. The injury caused him to miss the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France).

Webster never became a noncommissioned officer in his time of service, even though his fellow paratroopers wanted him to become a squad leader. He never did anything voluntarily or that would be cause for promotion, instead choosing to be “an observer and chronicler of the war” (which is touched on during episode 8 of HBO’s Band of Brothers). He did earn a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and a Good Conduct Medal while in combat, though.

After the war, he worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. He did try to write a memoir about his time in Europe, but it didn’t come to be until 1994. Webster had a keen interest in ocean life, sharks especially. This passion led him to write a book called Myth and Maneater: The Story of the Shark, and might also have led to his (untimely) death. Webster was lost at sea in September 1961, and his body was never recovered; it’s assumed that he probably drowned :(

Web was an English Lit major at Harvard, which is right up my alley. I tend to like the “sensitive writer” types, plus he’s really pretty (and not just in BoB). He got pretty cynical towards the end of the war, but can you blame him? I was super bummed when I found out he’d gone missing.

Captain Lewis Nixon (1918-1995) was a captain of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, of the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He was born into a wealthy family, and attended Yale University for 2 years before deciding to enlist and later become a paratrooper.
Nix never fired a single shot during his time in combat (D-Day on June 6th, 1944, Operation Market Garden from September 17th-25th 1944, the Battle of the Bulge from December 16th, 1944 to January 25th, 1945, and Operation Varsity on March 24th, 1945), but he made one of Easy’s most important contributions to the war effort. During the assault on Brécourt Manor, France on D-Day, he passed information given to him by (then) Lieutenant Dick Winters about the locations of all German artillery and machine gun positions up the chain of command by running the three miles from Brécourt to Utah Beach. Command then sent the first two tanks to arrive at the beach to support the paratroopers. He was later awarded a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and earned three combat jump stars on his Parachutist Badge for his service.
Nixon was notorious for his drinking habits (shown quite often in HBO’s Band of Brothers), which eventually caused him to be removed from field intelligence and reassigned as 2nd Battalion’s operations officer. When Easy arrived at Hitler’s “Eagle’s Nest” in May 1945, he had first choice of Hitler’s sizable (and largely stolen) wine collection. Drinking, partying, and failed marriages aside, I think Nix was a total babe (and not just cause Ron Livingston played him in BoB). I’m a sucker for the tall, dark, and snarky types…and obviously you have to be intelligent to get into freakin’ Yale.

Captain Lewis Nixon (1918-1995) was a captain of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, of the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He was born into a wealthy family, and attended Yale University for 2 years before deciding to enlist and later become a paratrooper.

Nix never fired a single shot during his time in combat (D-Day on June 6th, 1944, Operation Market Garden from September 17th-25th 1944, the Battle of the Bulge from December 16th, 1944 to January 25th, 1945, and Operation Varsity on March 24th, 1945), but he made one of Easy’s most important contributions to the war effort. During the assault on Brécourt Manor, France on D-Day, he passed information given to him by (then) Lieutenant Dick Winters about the locations of all German artillery and machine gun positions up the chain of command by running the three miles from Brécourt to Utah Beach. Command then sent the first two tanks to arrive at the beach to support the paratroopers. He was later awarded a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and earned three combat jump stars on his Parachutist Badge for his service.

Nixon was notorious for his drinking habits (shown quite often in HBO’s Band of Brothers), which eventually caused him to be removed from field intelligence and reassigned as 2nd Battalion’s operations officer. When Easy arrived at Hitler’s “Eagle’s Nest” in May 1945, he had first choice of Hitler’s sizable (and largely stolen) wine collection. Drinking, partying, and failed marriages aside, I think Nix was a total babe (and not just cause Ron Livingston played him in BoB). I’m a sucker for the tall, dark, and snarky types…and obviously you have to be intelligent to get into freakin’ Yale.

A message from mintike
This blog is the only reason I passed the AP US History exam with a 4/5. Thank you so much

I’M AMAZED AND HAPPY TO HEAR THAT!