Name: Claus von Stauffenberg
Description: German army officer. One of the important members of “German Resistance” movement. Tried to kill one of the important German.
Journey from nowhere to my being my crush: Attempted to kill Hitler. Failed. “Operation Valkyrie” failed. Executed by firing squad.

Name: Claus von Stauffenberg

Description: German army officer. One of the important members of “German Resistance” movement. Tried to kill one of the important German.

Journey from nowhere to my being my crush: Attempted to kill Hitler. Failed. “Operation Valkyrie” failed. Executed by firing squad.

Hector Castro (1904-1960), Uruguayan footballer.  Due to an accident in his childhood in which he chopped off half of his right arm with an electric saw (it happens to the best of us), fans gave Castro the nickname ’El Divino Manco”, or “the one handed god.” Far from being held back by his amputee status, Castro used his disability to his advantage, even injuring the Argentinian goalkeeper in the 1930 World Cup final by smacking him in the leg with his arm stump.  The Uruguayan scored the final goal in that match, assuring his team’s status as the first ever FIFA World Cup champions.  

Hector Castro (1904-1960), Uruguayan footballer.  Due to an accident in his childhood in which he chopped off half of his right arm with an electric saw (it happens to the best of us), fans gave Castro the nickname ’El Divino Manco”, or “the one handed god.” Far from being held back by his amputee status, Castro used his disability to his advantage, even injuring the Argentinian goalkeeper in the 1930 World Cup final by smacking him in the leg with his arm stump.  The Uruguayan scored the final goal in that match, assuring his team’s status as the first ever FIFA World Cup champions.  

David Kenyon Webster (1922-1961) was a private with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II.
Webster volunteered for the paratroopers in 1943, before he could graduate from Harvard University. He transferred to Easy after D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), and then fought in Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany) before sustaining a leg injury while stationed in “the Island” in Arnhem, Holland. The injury caused him to miss the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France).
Webster never became a noncommissioned officer in his time of service, even though his fellow paratroopers wanted him to become a squad leader. He never did anything voluntarily or that would be cause for promotion, instead choosing to be “an observer and chronicler of the war” (which is touched on during episode 8 of HBO’s Band of Brothers). He did earn a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and a Good Conduct Medal while in combat, though.
After the war, he worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. He did try to write a memoir about his time in Europe, but it didn’t come to be until 1994. Webster had a keen interest in ocean life, sharks especially. This passion led him to write a book called Myth and Maneater: The Story of the Shark, and might also have led to his (untimely) death. Webster was lost at sea in September 1961, and his body was never recovered; it’s assumed that he probably drowned :(
Web was an English Lit major at Harvard, which is right up my alley. I tend to like the “sensitive writer” types, plus he’s really pretty (and not just in BoB). He got pretty cynical towards the end of the war, but can you blame him? I was super bummed when I found out he’d gone missing.

David Kenyon Webster (1922-1961) was a private with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II.

Webster volunteered for the paratroopers in 1943, before he could graduate from Harvard University. He transferred to Easy after D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), and then fought in Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany) before sustaining a leg injury while stationed in “the Island” in Arnhem, Holland. The injury caused him to miss the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France).

Webster never became a noncommissioned officer in his time of service, even though his fellow paratroopers wanted him to become a squad leader. He never did anything voluntarily or that would be cause for promotion, instead choosing to be “an observer and chronicler of the war” (which is touched on during episode 8 of HBO’s Band of Brothers). He did earn a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and a Good Conduct Medal while in combat, though.

After the war, he worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Daily News. He did try to write a memoir about his time in Europe, but it didn’t come to be until 1994. Webster had a keen interest in ocean life, sharks especially. This passion led him to write a book called Myth and Maneater: The Story of the Shark, and might also have led to his (untimely) death. Webster was lost at sea in September 1961, and his body was never recovered; it’s assumed that he probably drowned :(

Web was an English Lit major at Harvard, which is right up my alley. I tend to like the “sensitive writer” types, plus he’s really pretty (and not just in BoB). He got pretty cynical towards the end of the war, but can you blame him? I was super bummed when I found out he’d gone missing.

Captain Lewis Nixon (1918-1995) was a captain of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, of the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He was born into a wealthy family, and attended Yale University for 2 years before deciding to enlist and later become a paratrooper.
Nix never fired a single shot during his time in combat (D-Day on June 6th, 1944, Operation Market Garden from September 17th-25th 1944, the Battle of the Bulge from December 16th, 1944 to January 25th, 1945, and Operation Varsity on March 24th, 1945), but he made one of Easy’s most important contributions to the war effort. During the assault on Brécourt Manor, France on D-Day, he passed information given to him by (then) Lieutenant Dick Winters about the locations of all German artillery and machine gun positions up the chain of command by running the three miles from Brécourt to Utah Beach. Command then sent the first two tanks to arrive at the beach to support the paratroopers. He was later awarded a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and earned three combat jump stars on his Parachutist Badge for his service.
Nixon was notorious for his drinking habits (shown quite often in HBO’s Band of Brothers), which eventually caused him to be removed from field intelligence and reassigned as 2nd Battalion’s operations officer. When Easy arrived at Hitler’s “Eagle’s Nest” in May 1945, he had first choice of Hitler’s sizable (and largely stolen) wine collection. Drinking, partying, and failed marriages aside, I think Nix was a total babe (and not just cause Ron Livingston played him in BoB). I’m a sucker for the tall, dark, and snarky types…and obviously you have to be intelligent to get into freakin’ Yale.

Captain Lewis Nixon (1918-1995) was a captain of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, of the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He was born into a wealthy family, and attended Yale University for 2 years before deciding to enlist and later become a paratrooper.

Nix never fired a single shot during his time in combat (D-Day on June 6th, 1944, Operation Market Garden from September 17th-25th 1944, the Battle of the Bulge from December 16th, 1944 to January 25th, 1945, and Operation Varsity on March 24th, 1945), but he made one of Easy’s most important contributions to the war effort. During the assault on Brécourt Manor, France on D-Day, he passed information given to him by (then) Lieutenant Dick Winters about the locations of all German artillery and machine gun positions up the chain of command by running the three miles from Brécourt to Utah Beach. Command then sent the first two tanks to arrive at the beach to support the paratroopers. He was later awarded a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and earned three combat jump stars on his Parachutist Badge for his service.

Nixon was notorious for his drinking habits (shown quite often in HBO’s Band of Brothers), which eventually caused him to be removed from field intelligence and reassigned as 2nd Battalion’s operations officer. When Easy arrived at Hitler’s “Eagle’s Nest” in May 1945, he had first choice of Hitler’s sizable (and largely stolen) wine collection. Drinking, partying, and failed marriages aside, I think Nix was a total babe (and not just cause Ron Livingston played him in BoB). I’m a sucker for the tall, dark, and snarky types…and obviously you have to be intelligent to get into freakin’ Yale.

A message from mintike
This blog is the only reason I passed the AP US History exam with a 4/5. Thank you so much

I’M AMAZED AND HAPPY TO HEAR THAT!

Eugene “Doc” Roe (1921-1998) was a medic in Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He had no real medical training, but he became extremely adept at patching and diagnosing wounds; after only 2 years as a medic, Roe was able to diagnose a Purple Heart wound of one soldier while attending to the wounds of another. He participated in D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany), and the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France). During his time in combat, Roe earned a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and an Army Good Conduct Medal.
Aside from his abilities as a medic, Roe’s fellow paratroopers have said that he was “there whenever he was needed, and how he got ‘there’ you often wondered.” A lieutenant in Easy Company nominated him for a Silver Star after a “devastating firefight where his exploits were typically outstanding [and] if any man…deserved such a medal, it was our medic.” Sadly, he never received the recognition he deserved.
Doc was born and lived in Louisiana, and even though his accent supposedly wasn’t as thick as we were led to believe on HBO’s Band of Brothers, I bet it was still pretty swoon-worthy. I think the real Gene Roe was just as cute as his BoB counterpart, Shane Taylor. His impressive medic skills and steadfastness to his company make him a hottie in my book, but I gotta say, his smile is just too adorable to ignore.

Eugene “Doc” Roe (1921-1998) was a medic in Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, in the 101st Airborne Division of the US Army during World War II. He had no real medical training, but he became extremely adept at patching and diagnosing wounds; after only 2 years as a medic, Roe was able to diagnose a Purple Heart wound of one soldier while attending to the wounds of another. He participated in D-Day (June 6th, 1944; Normandy, France), Operation Market Garden (September 17th-25th, 1944; the Netherlands and Germany), and the Battle of the Bulge (December 16th, 1944-January 25th, 1945; Bastogne, France). During his time in combat, Roe earned a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and an Army Good Conduct Medal.

Aside from his abilities as a medic, Roe’s fellow paratroopers have said that he was “there whenever he was needed, and how he got ‘there’ you often wondered.” A lieutenant in Easy Company nominated him for a Silver Star after a “devastating firefight where his exploits were typically outstanding [and] if any man…deserved such a medal, it was our medic.” Sadly, he never received the recognition he deserved.

Doc was born and lived in Louisiana, and even though his accent supposedly wasn’t as thick as we were led to believe on HBO’s Band of Brothers, I bet it was still pretty swoon-worthy. I think the real Gene Roe was just as cute as his BoB counterpart, Shane Taylor. His impressive medic skills and steadfastness to his company make him a hottie in my book, but I gotta say, his smile is just too adorable to ignore.

Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791).
Overall badass and cool dude.
P.S. his music is even sexier.

Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791).

Overall badass and cool dude.

P.S. his music is even sexier.

Emory Upton (1839-1881) was a United States Army General, most famously known for his brilliant strategies during the Civil War. Poor bby shot himself at age 41. He was hella cute AND had an amazing personality. He believed in women’s and African-American rights, was quiet, not afraid to speak his mind, and fiercely intelligent.

Emory Upton (1839-1881) was a United States Army General, most famously known for his brilliant strategies during the Civil War. Poor bby shot himself at age 41. He was hella cute AND had an amazing personality. He believed in women’s and African-American rights, was quiet, not afraid to speak his mind, and fiercely intelligent.

Friedrich Gundolf, German poet and literary scholar

Friedrich Gundolf, German poet and literary scholar

Michael Faraday is a hero of mine—we studied about his works in early science classes, but like in a lot of middle schools, never really went into the history behind the man or the deeper aspects of the theories, experiments, and discoveries. Long story short, he was born into poverty, received little formal education, and despite behind held back by other scientists, depression, and memory problems later in life, he revolutionized the world of science with his studies of electricity and magnetism, identifying magnetic fields and how they effect light and connect to gravity, creating inventions like the first transformers and generators, and creating the building blocks for scientists like Einstein and Tesla.

With the assistance of James Clerk Maxwell, one of the most famous mathematical physicists ever, Faraday’s theories were written in a way that could be understood and accepted by other scientists of the time. To add to how awesome Faraday is, Einstein kept a picture of him, Maxwell, and Newton on his study wall.

If you want to hear more about him, just watch episode ten of “Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey”. They do the man (and many others) justice.

Michael Faraday is a hero of mine—we studied about his works in early science classes, but like in a lot of middle schools, never really went into the history behind the man or the deeper aspects of the theories, experiments, and discoveries. Long story short, he was born into poverty, received little formal education, and despite behind held back by other scientists, depression, and memory problems later in life, he revolutionized the world of science with his studies of electricity and magnetism, identifying magnetic fields and how they effect light and connect to gravity, creating inventions like the first transformers and generators, and creating the building blocks for scientists like Einstein and Tesla.

With the assistance of James Clerk Maxwell, one of the most famous mathematical physicists ever, Faraday’s theories were written in a way that could be understood and accepted by other scientists of the time. To add to how awesome Faraday is, Einstein kept a picture of him, Maxwell, and Newton on his study wall.

If you want to hear more about him, just watch episode ten of “Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey”. They do the man (and many others) justice.