Fredrich Nietzche don’t you love his eyes and his WONDERFUL MUSTACHE

Fredrich Nietzche don’t you love his eyes and his WONDERFUL MUSTACHE

Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946) was one of the primary figures who showed that American photography could be a serious and unique art form. He is known for his artful images on the subject of industrializtion and on the many pictures he took of his wife Georgia O’Keeffe. He was known for using both the silver gelatin technique and the photogravure technique. One of his most famous pieces is The Hand of Man.

Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946) was one of the primary figures who showed that American photography could be a serious and unique art form. He is known for his artful images on the subject of industrializtion and on the many pictures he took of his wife Georgia O’Keeffe. He was known for using both the silver gelatin technique and the photogravure technique. One of his most famous pieces is The Hand of Man.

This handsome man is Sir Frederick Banting, co-discoverer of insulin.
Banting was decorated for bravery during WWI when, as a medic in the Canadian Army, he was injured but refused to be evacuated & instead continued taking care of wounded soldiers.
After the war, he was a pharmacology professor at the University of Toronto, and in 1923 he & his assistant, Charles Best discovered that insulin could control diabetes. Banting was awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine. He split the prize money with Best, who was not even nominated for the award.
During WWII he worked with the Royal Canadian Air Force, looking at the medical issues of pilots at high altitude. He was killed in a plane crash in Newfoundland in 1941, on his way to England to begin tests on a new type of flight suit.
Banting was a total Renaissance Man - he hung with the Group of Seven & enjoyed painting & sketching in his spare time.
Plus, I dare you not to get lost in those eyes. Sigh.

This handsome man is Sir Frederick Banting, co-discoverer of insulin.

Banting was decorated for bravery during WWI when, as a medic in the Canadian Army, he was injured but refused to be evacuated & instead continued taking care of wounded soldiers.

After the war, he was a pharmacology professor at the University of Toronto, and in 1923 he & his assistant, Charles Best discovered that insulin could control diabetes. Banting was awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine. He split the prize money with Best, who was not even nominated for the award.

During WWII he worked with the Royal Canadian Air Force, looking at the medical issues of pilots at high altitude. He was killed in a plane crash in Newfoundland in 1941, on his way to England to begin tests on a new type of flight suit.

Banting was a total Renaissance Man - he hung with the Group of Seven & enjoyed painting & sketching in his spare time.

Plus, I dare you not to get lost in those eyes. Sigh.

Leon Battista Alberti needs to be definitely on this list. This handsome Italian fellow born illegitimately in 1404 is the incorporation of the Italien Renaissance. Not only did he look good, he literally could do anything: He was writer, mathematician, artist and architect, who built some of the most beautiful houses in Italy! 

Leon Battista Alberti needs to be definitely on this list. This handsome Italian fellow born illegitimately in 1404 is the incorporation of the Italien Renaissance. Not only did he look good, he literally could do anything: He was writer, mathematician, artist and architect, who built some of the most beautiful houses in Italy! 

historyofromanovs:

It was said that one of the most famous spirits in Saint Petersburg was Paul I. According to some sources Paul first saw the ghostly face of the founder of the city, Peter the Great, on the Senate Square in 1770 and learned from him that he would die soon. Thirty years later, Paul was assassinated in his newly built palace, the Saint Michael’s Castle. His ghost was claimed to be seen by many. Some servants insisted to have seen his restless ghost wandering in the Gatchina Palace at night. The ghost allegedly appeared on the eve of fateful events. 
On the claims of these servants, many people in history had hoped to see the ghost. The most prominent case was Nicholas II and his youngest sister Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna, who reminisced to have been hunting at night for the ghost of their great-great-grandfather when they were just children in Gatchina. However, unfortunately for them, they did not see the ghostly figure of their ancestor. The ghost was said to be quite harmless and was often heard playing a flute.

historyofromanovs:

It was said that one of the most famous spirits in Saint Petersburg was Paul I. According to some sources Paul first saw the ghostly face of the founder of the city, Peter the Great, on the Senate Square in 1770 and learned from him that he would die soon. Thirty years later, Paul was assassinated in his newly built palace, the Saint Michael’s Castle. His ghost was claimed to be seen by many. Some servants insisted to have seen his restless ghost wandering in the Gatchina Palace at night. The ghost allegedly appeared on the eve of fateful events.

On the claims of these servants, many people in history had hoped to see the ghost. The most prominent case was Nicholas II and his youngest sister Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna, who reminisced to have been hunting at night for the ghost of their great-great-grandfather when they were just children in Gatchina. However, unfortunately for them, they did not see the ghostly figure of their ancestor. The ghost was said to be quite harmless and was often heard playing a flute.

Mikhail Lermontov was a nineteenth-century Russian writer, mostly known for the novel A Hero of Our Time. Lermontov was also equally a gifted poet. That we can only see portraits of him when in his prime, where he wears military jackets, is due to his military career. Writing is something he undertook as a pass-time activity as child, and eventually turned out to have a passion and talent for it.
Lermontov was a babe. Just look at his dark, almond-shaped eyes, perfectly maintained facial hair, slicked hair, rosy lips, a finely sculpted Grecian nose, and that stylish jacket of his! 
He did not live long, since he was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Even so, his handsome appearance will always be remembered (alongside his contribution to the Russian literary canon, of course).

Mikhail Lermontov was a nineteenth-century Russian writer, mostly known for the novel A Hero of Our Time. Lermontov was also equally a gifted poet. That we can only see portraits of him when in his prime, where he wears military jackets, is due to his military career. Writing is something he undertook as a pass-time activity as child, and eventually turned out to have a passion and talent for it.

Lermontov was a babe. Just look at his dark, almond-shaped eyes, perfectly maintained facial hair, slicked hair, rosy lips, a finely sculpted Grecian nose, and that stylish jacket of his! 

He did not live long, since he was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Even so, his handsome appearance will always be remembered (alongside his contribution to the Russian literary canon, of course).

Severino di Giovanni (1901 - 1931) was an Italian anarchist who immigrated to Argentina, where he became the best-known anarchist figure in that country for his campaign of violence in support of Sacco and Vanzetti and antifascism.
Di Giovanni started rebelling against authority at a very young age. At the age of 19 he was orphaned, and at the age of twenty (1921), fully embraced the anarchist movement. In 1922, Benito Mussolini’s Black Shirts took power during the March on Rome so Giovanni and his family decided to exile themselves to Argentina.
In Argentina he became on of the leading figures of the anarquist movement, where he continued with his comrades their anti-fascist campaign, bombing the Ford Motor Company, headquarters of Citybank and the Bank of Boston and the Italian consulate killing nine fascists and injuring 34 others. At the time, the Italian consulate bombing was the deadliest bombing ever to take place in Argentina
When the government was overthrown by the military coup in Argentina, Di Giovanni passed long periods of his time in reclusion, but in January 1931, he was arrested after being seriously injured in a gun battle.
Severino Di Giovanni was executed by firing squad on 1 February 1931; he was 29 years old. He shouted “Evviva l’Anarchia!” (Long live Anarchy!), before being hit by at least eight 7.65 mm Mauser rifle bullets.

Severino di Giovanni (1901 - 1931) was an Italian anarchist who immigrated to Argentina, where he became the best-known anarchist figure in that country for his campaign of violence in support of Sacco and Vanzetti and antifascism.

Di Giovanni started rebelling against authority at a very young age. At the age of 19 he was orphaned, and at the age of twenty (1921), fully embraced the anarchist movement. In 1922, Benito Mussolini’s Black Shirts took power during the March on Rome so Giovanni and his family decided to exile themselves to Argentina.

In Argentina he became on of the leading figures of the anarquist movement, where he continued with his comrades their anti-fascist campaign, bombing the Ford Motor Company, headquarters of Citybank and the Bank of Boston and the Italian consulate killing nine fascists and injuring 34 others. At the time, the Italian consulate bombing was the deadliest bombing ever to take place in Argentina

When the government was overthrown by the military coup in Argentina, Di Giovanni passed long periods of his time in reclusion, but in January 1931, he was arrested after being seriously injured in a gun battle.

Severino Di Giovanni was executed by firing squad on 1 February 1931; he was 29 years old. He shouted Evviva l’Anarchia! (Long live Anarchy!), before being hit by at least eight 7.65 mm Mauser rifle bullets.

A message from dragonsbreathetoo
I would go back in time and marry Alexander the great if at all possible.

I FEEL THAT.

Ladies (and possibly gentlemen), wave hello to this handsome Italian (who would later be naturalized as French) stud. His name is Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, an explorer who aided France in its colonization of Central Africa. Get this: he first encountered Africa on an anti-slavery mission. Yes, a beautiful man with morals. Look but don’t touch, cause he’s sizzling (literally, that African sun is scorching).

Ladies (and possibly gentlemen), wave hello to this handsome Italian (who would later be naturalized as French) stud. His name is Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, an explorer who aided France in its colonization of Central Africa. Get this: he first encountered Africa on an anti-slavery mission. Yes, a beautiful man with morals. Look but don’t touch, cause he’s sizzling (literally, that African sun is scorching).

This is Ron Speirs, a paratrooper with the 506th PIR, 101st Airborne division during WWII, he was a total bad-ass and many of his exploits were made known with the miniseries Band of Brothers. Speirs single-handedly captured a 105 mm howitzer on D-Day, he ran through a town full of German soldiers simply to relay an order to another company with whom they’d lost contact with and then ran back to his men. Stories about Speirs became legendary, such was his bad-assery. He was said to have killed anywhere from between 6-30 German POW’s during D-Day but not before giving them all cigarettes, it was also common knowledge that he’d shot one of his own soldiers for refusing to follow orders. 
His nickname was Bloody among the enlisted men, yet he was one of the finest combat officers in the entire battalion. Speirs served in Korea, and later became the American governor  for the Spandau Prison in Berlin which housed many high-ranked Nazis. Ron Speirs retired from the military in 1964 as a Lieutenant Colonel. 

This is Ron Speirs, a paratrooper with the 506th PIR, 101st Airborne division during WWII, he was a total bad-ass and many of his exploits were made known with the miniseries Band of Brothers. Speirs single-handedly captured a 105 mm howitzer on D-Day, he ran through a town full of German soldiers simply to relay an order to another company with whom they’d lost contact with and then ran back to his men. Stories about Speirs became legendary, such was his bad-assery. He was said to have killed anywhere from between 6-30 German POW’s during D-Day but not before giving them all cigarettes, it was also common knowledge that he’d shot one of his own soldiers for refusing to follow orders. 

His nickname was Bloody among the enlisted men, yet he was one of the finest combat officers in the entire battalion. Speirs served in Korea, and later became the American governor  for the Spandau Prison in Berlin which housed many high-ranked Nazis. Ron Speirs retired from the military in 1964 as a Lieutenant Colonel.